How to write a possessive last name ending in s

My sister's friend's investments the investments belonging to a friend of my sister My sister's friends' investments the investments belonging to several friends of my sister My sisters' friend's investments the investments belonging to a friend of several of my sisters My sisters' friends' investments the investments belonging to several friends of several of my sisters Kingsley Amison being challenged to produce a sentence whose meaning depended on a possessive apostrophe, came up with: English spelling retained many inflections that were not pronounced as syllablesnotably verb endings -est, -eth, -es, -ed and the noun ending -es, which marked either plurals or possessives also known as genitives ; see Possessive apostrophebelow.

English plurals

Use in forming some plurals[ edit ] The apostrophe can be used in plural abbreviations as in the team logo of the Oakland A's. Correct The bomb went off at eleven-thirty.

Names based on a first name are more likely to take an apostrophe, but this is not always the case. Plurals and Apostrophes We use an apostrophe to create plural forms in two limited situations: In the absence of specific exceptional treatment in style guides, the possessives of these plurals are formed by adding an apostrophe and an s in the standard way: Where does it hurt.

But you could use numerals. Use the words to, through, or until with from, and and with between. Remember that personal pronouns create special problems in the formation of possessives. The hall clock was wrong; it showed eight thirty. Incorrect The roadster crept along at no more than 28 mph.

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Style guides typically advise consulting an official source for the standard form of the name as one would do if uncertain about other aspects of the spelling of the name ; some tend towards greater prescriptiveness, for or against such an apostrophe.

The apostrophe here may be seen as marking a contraction where the prefix Mc or Mac would normally appear.

Possessive - s' or s's with proper nouns - Chris' or Chris's dog?

It's [it has] been wonderful seeing you again. This was regarded as representing the Old English genitive singular inflection -es. Although less common, some contemporary writers still follow the older practice of omitting the second s in all cases ending with a sibilant, but usually not when written -x or -xe.

Sources that rule on the matter appear to favour the following forms, in which there is both an s added to form the plural, and a separate s added for the possessive: He needed a two-thirds majority to win the election.

Riggs News

Using the possessive will affect how we read the sentence. The possessive of it was originally it's, and it is a common mistake today to write it this way, though the apostrophe was dropped by the early s and authorities are now unanimous that it's can be only a contraction of it is or it has.

Riggs News

The word following the phrase one of the as an object of the preposition of will always be plural. He was six foot two. Correct He planned to be out of town between August September 5. In recent times there has been an increasing tendency to drop the apostrophe. We rehearsed for the opening night on Friday.

It having rained for only one hour didn't help the crops. He was six feet two. Here are some sample grammar wall charts prepared with and used by young students: A special situation exists when a subject seems not to agree with its predicate.

In modern usage, apostrophes are generally omitted when letters are removed from the start of a word, particularly for a compound word. These principles are universally accepted. I recommend it without reservation. Importance for disambiguation Each of these four phrases listed in Steven Pinker 's The Language Instinct has a distinct meaning: If you have to include a full telephone number—because something about the digits is vital—use numerals, even in dialogue.

Do not use ordinal numbers for dates that include month, or month and year, written in this format. The same principles and residual uncertainties apply with "naturalised" English words, like Illinois and Arkansas.

34 Responses to “Possessive of Proper Names Ending in S” Nancy Romness on August 04, am. Thanks for this clarification, Maeve.

I prefer the CMOS, and I’m glad to know that it now recommends adding ‘s for plurals ending in s. Classically, it is not correct to just add an apostrophe to a last name that already ends in “s” if it is singular possessive. The logic is that all names should be treated the same.

It’s one of those grammar glitches that makes English teachers twitch, and it’s a perplexing punctuation problem. Knowing when to use an apostrophe and when to use apostrophe -s can be tricky, but this grammar quickie provides all you need to know about plural versus possession when it comes to apostrophe -s.

It’s one of those grammar glitches that makes English teachers twitch, and it’s a perplexing punctuation problem. Knowing when to use an apostrophe and when to use apostrophe -s can be tricky, but this grammar quickie provides all you need to know about plural versus possession when it comes to apostrophe -s.

Print this document Estimated: 10 pages Riggs' Content What We Teach Phonetic Content/Handwriting: Instruction begins by teaching the sound(s) of, and letter formation for (manuscript writing), the 71 "Orton" phonograms [a phonogram is a letter or combination of letters which stands for one sound in a given word OR a phonogram is a combination of phoneme and grapheme] which are the commonly.

Plural last names. Making a last name plural should never involve an apostrophe. The members of the Johnson and Smith families, for instance, are the Johnsons and the Smiths, not the Johnson’s and the Smith’s.

How to write a possessive last name ending in s
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Last names (plurals and possessives) – Grammarist